Figurative language= pdf

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Figurative Language of O. Henry: Twenty-three selected examples of figurative language from O. Henry’s short stories. This double-sided worksheet will give students plenty of practice. Figurative Language of O. Henry RTF Figurative Language of O. Henry PDF Preview Figurative Language of O. Henry View Answers Ereading Worksheet | Online ... Interpreting Figurative Language ! According to Palmer and Brooks (2004), “figurative language interpretation is based on students’ schemata; therefore, direct, or explicit, instruction is often needed to provide the knowledge necessary to understand not only the figurative language expressions but the context surrounding them as well.” 6 If you’re teaching figurative language, you might like my Figurative Language in Poetry Printables. You might also find these blog posts useful: Character Traits: Building Vocabulary Point of View: 3 Free Graphic Organizers Teaching Main Idea Text Features: Integrating Technology 18 No Prep Worksheets: Poems Included! Find me on Facebook Underline the figurative language in each sentence. Rewrite the sentence with the same meaning omitting the figurative language. 1. The athlete was as strong as an ox. _____ 2. The children were covered with dirt from head to toe. Figurative and Literal Language Literal:words function exactly as defined The boy’s room was messy. The left fielder dropped the baseball. Figurative: You have to figure it out The boy’s room was a pigsty. The left fielder has butterfingers. ^These are figuresof speech. Academia.edu is a platform for academics to share research papers. figurative language was found in John Legend song selected songs lyric are simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification, oxymoron, paradox, symbolic, repetition, allusion, and anumerasio. Figurative language in the song could make the readers understand that lyrics of the song Figurative Language: What Is It? Circle the correct answer for each question below. 1) “As straight as an arrow” is an example of what? a) metaphor b) simile c) onomatopoeia d) hyperbole 2) “Lucky lady” is an example of what? a) metaphor b) oxymoron c) alliteration d) onomatopoeia 3) “Boom!” is an example of what? Jazz up student writing with figurative language activities. ... Alliteration Meets Art. Standards Met: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.5; McREL Visual Arts Standard 1 (Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes related to the visual arts) Figurative Language Worksheet Set of 12, Middle Grades for Common Core This Figurative Language is Reading Candy Worksheet Set includes 12 worksheets and answer keys ready for you to use in your classroom. Download the preview file for a free simile worksheet and answer key that you can use right a May 13, 2013 · Even though figurative language is not factually true, it helps writers re-create an experience for readers, describe something vividly, or express a thought that literal language could never convey. There are many kinds of figurative language, most of which are explained below. Often, these figurative language techniques are used in combination. the author’s choice of diction, imagery, figurative language, details, and syntax. • (In other words, tone is how the author feels about his subject, character, or audience, and he shows it through the words he chooses, and how he puts them together.) Figurative language v. literal language There are great differences between the oral use of figurative language and its written use. Nevertheless, the only separately published textbook for figurative language is almost entirely concerned with oral figurative language, offering such examples as “you have a heart of stone” or Jazz up student writing with figurative language activities. ... Alliteration Meets Art. Standards Met: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.5; McREL Visual Arts Standard 1 (Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes related to the visual arts) In this unit, students will learn the difference between figurative and literal language and understand the importance of using Figurative Language to make text more interesting. I like to spend a sufficient amount of time on each strategy to allow for an introduction, modeling, scaffolding, independent practice, assessment, and reflection. – Use this as a quick reference for figurative language, literary elements, and literary techniques. Figurative Language . Alliteration - The repetition of the same initial letter, sound, or group of sounds in a series of words. Figurative language is that which provides the reader with comparisons, substitutions, and patterns that shape meaning. Literary texts sometimes make concentrated use of figurative language. However, most language is figurative in some sense, because words do not have single, objective meanings. See also: imagery Figurative Language Figurative Language: What Is It? Circle the correct answer for each question below. 1) “As straight as an arrow” is an example of what? a) metaphor b) simile c) onomatopoeia d) hyperbole 2) “Lucky lady” is an example of what? a) metaphor b) oxymoron c) alliteration d) onomatopoeia 3) “Boom!” is an example of what? Figurative Language “Figuring it Out” 20. She was dressed to the nines. 21. The early bird catches the worm. 22. Old news 23. Your face is killing me! 24. She was as white as a ghost. 25. She has a skeleton in her closet. Figurative and Literal Language Literally: words function exactly as defined The car is blue. He caught the football. Figurative Language Vocabulary 1. Metaphor - A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things. An implied comparison, usually says A is B. Life is a yo-yo, constant ups and downs. 2. Simile - A stated comparison between two things that are actually unlike, but that have something in common. Expresses comparison using like or as. the author’s choice of diction, imagery, figurative language, details, and syntax. • (In other words, tone is how the author feels about his subject, character, or audience, and he shows it through the words he chooses, and how he puts them together.) Figurative Language Quiz 1. The hockey player lost his control when the puck ran across the ice. 2. The snow on the ski hill was powdered sugar. 3. The coach was as upset as a lion when his team lost the game. 4. Freddy French fired five fabulous free throws. 5. The snowmobile was a rocket in the newly fallen snow. 6. Interpreting figurative language Reading Comprehension Worksheet Practice ~~~~~ Authors use figurative language to make descriptions more interesting. Figurative language does not mean exactly what the words say. - A simile compares two things in a creative way, using the words “like” or “as.” Academia.edu is a platform for academics to share research papers. FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE Alliteration: Repeated consonant sounds at the beginning of words. “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.” Assonance: Repeated vowel sounds. “The cat sat on the mat.” Onomatopoeia: Words whose sound suggests its meaning. “The bees buzzed.” Imagery: Creating pictures for the senses (through, e.g., similes or Working with Figurative Language Part I: Match Each phrase below is a type of figurative language. Match the phrase to the correct type by writing the letter in the blank. Type Phrase 1) _____ alliteration A. His heart was a block of ice. 2) _____ simile B. open secret 3) _____ metaphor C. pink and purple popsicles Figurative Language Test 1 Directions: Choose only one answer. You are responsible for making clean marks and erasing your mistakes. Try your best. When you are done, check your answers. SECTION 1 – DEFINITIONS: Match the term with the definition. Shade in the appropriate bubble. For questions 1 through 4. Not all of the choices are used. 1 ... Some types of Figurative Language Simile •a figure of speech in which two things are compared using „as‟, „as when‟, „like‟, „than‟, or other equivalent constructions •asserts similarity Example: "My love is like a red, red rose" (Robert Burn) " He looked like a Russian priest with imperial bearing Figurative Language Notes Simile Similes are used to compare one thing to another. They always use either the words Zlike or Zas. EX: My moms chocolate chip cookies turned out as hard as a rock. Metaphor Metaphors are used to compare one thing to another. They do not use the words like or as the way similes do. FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE IMAGERY: vivid description that includes details that appeal to the senses e.g. “The lake was left shivering by the touch of morning wind.” IDIOM: an expression whose meaning is different from the meaning of its individual words e.g. “A chip on your shoulder” SYMBOLISM: an object that stands for an idea In this unit, students will learn the difference between figurative and literal language and understand the importance of using Figurative Language to make text more interesting. I like to spend a sufficient amount of time on each strategy to allow for an introduction, modeling, scaffolding, independent practice, assessment, and reflection. Underline the figurative language in each sentence. Rewrite the sentence with the same meaning omitting the figurative language. 1. The athlete was as strong as an ox. _____ 2. The children were covered with dirt from head to toe. ID: 34652 Language: English School subject: Literature Grade/level: 8-9 Age: 12-13 Main content: Figurative Language Other contents: Add to my workbooks (25) Download file pdf ... Figurative Language Resource Page A tool that an author uses to help readers visualize what is happening in the story. Some Types of Figurative Language Alliteration: Repeated consonant sounds at the beginning of several words in a phrase (Robbie saw rabbits resting by roses.) Hyperbole: An exaggeration (That building can touch the clouds.) Figurative Language Quiz 1. The hockey player lost his control when the puck ran across the ice. 2. The snow on the ski hill was powdered sugar. 3. The coach was as upset as a lion when his team lost the game. 4. Freddy French fired five fabulous free throws. 5. The snowmobile was a rocket in the newly fallen snow. 6.